Salon Discussion; What have the Georgians ever done for us?

Salon Discussion; What have the Georgians ever done for us?

 

Monday 13 February 7-9pm
The Georgian Group
6 Fitzroy Square, London, W1T 5DX

Special Guests
Eleanor Doughty
Newspaper journalist and property writer

Cassius Clay
Historian & Modern Day Dandy

 

Millennials take on the Georgians during this informal event for those interested in history, art, architecture, enlightened conversation and a glass or two of wine.

This special late opening viewing of the Splendour! Art in Living Craftsmanship exhibition is a chance to meet up with fellow architects, young professionals, heritage enthusiasts, art lovers and philosophers at the Georgian Group’s Fitzroy Square HQ.

The event will have an exciting format, somewhere between Britain’s Got Talent and a University Union Debate. We still have some spaces for panelists and judges. If you think you have what it takes to answer the question above or judge the competition, please email faithannewaddell@gmail.com with your 10-minute idea. The most compelling piece will win a bottle of champagne!

Places limited, reserve here:
https://georgiansalondiscussion.eventbrite.co.uk

 

Cassius Clay is a PhD candidate in history at the University of Cambridge, having completed MPhil degrees with the departments of Modern European History and History of Art. He majored in art history at Yale as an undergraduate and received the Paul Mellon Fellowship to pursue these graduate studies at Cambridge. 
 
Clay’s recent research has analyzed diplomatic tensions between the United Kingdom and the United States over the strategic control of industrial diamonds during World War II. He is in the process of completing his thesis on the interwar portraits of British painter Meredith Frampton, a Royal Academician active 1918-1945. Clay has interned at Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts as well was Christie’s and the Morgan Library & Museum in New York. He has also worked as a creative consultant for Kanye West and as a student guide at the Yale Center for British Art.